CA Tiger Salamander
CTS
Photo: Robert Fletcher
CA Tiger Salamander

The California tiger salamander is a vulnerable amphibian native to Northern California. It breeds in ponds and vernal pools, entering the water with the onset of heavy rains in December and January. Shortly after breeding and depositing eggs, adults leave the pond and disperse to underground burrows where they spend the remainder of the year. Juveniles grow to nearly adult size over the next few months and then disperse to terrestrial burrows in late summer, returning years later to breed as adults. Both aquatic and upland terrestrial habitat is critical to the survival of the species.

Banks Featuring this Species

The Ohlone Preserve Conservation Bank(OPCB) is located in Southern Alameda County and has been open since 2005. The bank contains 640 acres of oak woodland, chaparral, and grassland habitat. It is bisected by San Antonio Creek and has four perennial ponds on the site that support breeding CA tiger salamanders and CA red-legged frogs. The extensive chamise chaparral provides excellent habitat for the Alameda whipsnake which exists on site. The OPCB contains habitat that supports numerous native species of plants and wildlife. The OPCB, along with 1280 additional contiguous acres, is owned and managed by Fletcher Conservation Lands. The preserve forms an extensive contiguous land mass with watershed lands of the San Francisco PUC and openspace preserves of the East Bay Regional Park District.

MHCB, Mountain House, Bethany, Byron

Mountain House Conservation Bank is located in eastern Alameda county, north of Livermore, Ca. The bank consists of 147 acres of grassland, seasonal alkali wetland, perennial wetlands and pond habitat. The property is adjacent to DFG's Byron Conservation Bank and is just north of the Bethany Reservoir, a state managed facility.

Ohlone West Conservation Bank (OWCB) occurs within Southern Alameda County and is immediately adjacent to the existing Ohlone Preserve Conservation Bank, owned and managed by Fletcher Conservation Lands. It is contiguous with watershed lands owned by the San Francisco PUC and wilderness preserves of the East Bay Regional Park District. OWCB has been agency-approved and is now open for mitigation needs.